Cooler Master HAF Stacker 935: Lego chassis

Cooler Master HAF Stacker 935: Lego chassis

Large chassis have become a rarity in our offices. The reasons for that are few, but the main “culprit” is the advent of mobile devices in computer market. The number of hardware enthusiasts who handp...

HTC One Max: HTC in the world of phablets

HTC One Max: HTC in the world of phablets

After the excellent HTC One, it was logical for HTC to sail into waters of large smartphones. As was the case with Sony Xperia Z and Z Ultra, HTC One Max is, basically, an enlarged HTC One, although t...

ASUS Rampage IV Black Edition: Intended for the overclocking elite

ASUS Rampage IV Black Edition: Intended for the overclocking elite

As soon as some time passes without ASUS giving their competition a “homework”, we can safely expect an avalanche of exclusive products. This time it's the new motherboard which will make most of over...

Gigabyte GA-X79-UP4: Friends forever

Gigabyte GA-X79-UP4: Friends forever

The best motherboard doesn’t necessarily have to be the one that has the most of everything, simply because some of us don’t use a great number of capabilities that a device has. True, we would all pr...

Sony Xperia Z Ultra: Smartphone with the biggest screen

Sony Xperia Z Ultra: Smartphone with the biggest screen

Only two years ago, when Samsung started a new trend of producing smartphones with big screens with the Note model, everybody thought that nobody wanted to use a phone that big and that concept doesn’...

ASUS RAIDR Express SSD: Beating records at all costs

ASUS RAIDR Express SSD: Beating records at all costs

Sometimes, it’s not possible to make the fastest device of a certain kind in the most elegant ways. Simply, it requires breaching the borders of the comfortable, so the result of the desire to reach t...

  • Cooler Master HAF Stacker 935: Lego chassis

  • HTC One Max: HTC in the world of phablets

  • ASUS Rampage IV Black Edition: Intended for the overclocking elite

  • Gigabyte GA-X79-UP4: Friends forever

  • Sony Xperia Z Ultra: Smartphone with the biggest screen

  • ASUS RAIDR Express SSD: Beating records at all costs

Home - Reviews - Peripherals

Cooler Master Storm Mech: Your own designer

Mechanical keyboards are starting to become really popular and the trendsetter is the Cooler Master. Even though most manufacturers are starting to use this technology, such models are still relatively exotic. Actually, that’s how it would have been if not for Cooler Master, whose portfolio includes a large number of versions and models, so it’s possible to find the desired model without much trouble. The newest product in this line is called Mech, and it’s a top-quality product when it comes to CM Storm. That means we expect only the best, but at the same time it means that it will put a sizable hole in our pockets.
mech 79 cover

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Logitech G430: Home cinema on your head

Logitech refreshed their whole gamer-intended series. From mice and keyboards to headsets which are a necessity of every gamer PC. This time, we’ve had the chance to try out Logitech G430, headset whose main feature is the fact that it’s capable of reproducing 7.1 audio. This ensures the accurate enemy positioning in tense online matches. Aside from that, the quality of sound in other games and any other multimedia content is raised to the next level. Of course, with certain compromises, but let’s start at the beginning.
g430 blue profile-extend 300 dpi cover

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Logitech G500s: Legend that endures

When it first appeared on the market, Logitech MX 500 became an instant hit and it long served as an example for other manufacturers. Even when many models started using laser instead of the classic optic sensor, MX 500 resisted the competition, even among its own company. Many gamers thought there will never be anything better than MX 500. Or just ask any experienced gamer which mouse was the best in their time and in 90% of the time, the answer will be MX 500.
logitech g500s cover

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Kingston Siberia V2 HyperX: Ten year anniversary with style

Yes, we’re aware that this sounds very strange, because so far Kingston wasn’t present in the headphones market, but for celebrating 10 years of existence, they entered into a business relationship with the SteelSeries company, which made the limited series of their famous Siberia V2 model, dressed into HyperX suit. Is this Kingston’s way of gauging the market, and can we expect to see first Kingston headphones are questions for which we’ll have to wait a bit to have them answered, and in the meantime, we’ll talk about the model named SteelSeries Siberia V2 HyperX edition.
img 9491 cover

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LG PD232: Mobile printer

Cell phones have been evolving for decades from the devices mainly intended for making calls to universal products with functionalities that first users couldn’t even imagine. Over time, they became cameras, compasses, devices for navigation and audio and video reproduction, computers that enable surfing the internet and social networks and use of a large number of practically free business and pleasure applications… and much more.
2013 pocket photo mcp 0000 product image cover

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Asus AC66: Evolution, next step

Whenever we changed our desktop HDD, we’d always think we could never possibly need a larger one… until we’d run out of space six months later. It’s similar with the speed of wireless networks today. The last thirteen years have seen wireless networks soar from the modest 11 Mbps (802.11b) to the I’m-never-possibly-going-to-need 1300 Mbps, proposed by the latest IEEE 802.11ac standard. With the latest cloud technology development trends in mind, as well as the fact that there are more and more online services offering unlimited storage space, it’s not going to be a question of how much room there is, but how fast it can be accessed. Besides, quality storage and use of new video technologies (such as 4K UHD) will require us to upgrade our quickly aging wireless infrastructure with a more serious and powerful one. It doesn’t come across as surprising, then, that the rate of improvement in wireless technologies seems to be increasing.
rt-ac66u 2 cover

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Asus Xtion: 3, 2, 1... Xtion!

When Microsoft announced “Project Natal” at 2009’s rendition of the E3 fair, most presumed it would be some sort of response to the ultra-popular Nintendo Wii. Of course, from today’s point of view, compared to the Wii Controller, “Project Natal” was equivalent to a spaceship. About a year and a half later, the said project gave birth to Kinect, and the rest is history. Kinect is based on technology developed by the Israeli company PrimeSense, based on using cameras and depth sensors in order to enable object tracking and gesticulation. Although it all looks relatively simple, the fact remains that no one has managed to successfully copy the technology thus far (not even the Chinese), which shows just how complex this system is. Kinect brought a whole new dimension to Xbox 360 gaming, and the so-called Kinect hackers were quick to surface as well, using this add-on for a variety of purposes.
xtion cover

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Asus Xonar Essence One: For headphones and for speakers

Ever since we first tested the ASUS Xonar STX soundcard, which passed our tests with flying colours, it was clear to us that ASUS has stepped firmly into audiophile waters. A number of soundcards and headphones have been presented in the series in the meantime, and the device we’re testing today is the latest addition to the fold in the high-end segment, namely Xonar Essence One. The device has a set of digital inputs, USB, coaxial and TOSLINK. These inputs accept digital signals in sampling rates of up to 192 KHz. The outputs consist of a pair of standard RCA (CINCH) connectors, and surprisingly enough, a pair of professional XLR-out connectors. The analogue signal is then conducted from the converter output to the integrated headphone amplifier input or the said RCA or XLR outputs, and then via appropriate cables to preamp, integrated amp, mixer or active speakers. The front panel contains all controls and commands, as well as analogue headphone output with the standard jack (6.3 mm) or a mini-jack adapter (3.5 mm). In a word, it’s a very versatile and compact gadget.
Xonar Essence One 1 cover

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Mouse: The world's most famous rodent

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If we have a look at the history and evolution of PC components, one that's arguably changed most (and most drastically) over the many years in service is the one that we all use on a daily basis, one that's so essential to the concept of the PC that all know what it is. Yet this essential peripheral is being bluntly disregarded by most users nowadays, despite the fact that it's literally the key element to the use of the PC and that any graphical environment would be rendered useless without it. You've guessed it, we're talking about the mouse! This unusual electronic piece of equipment has gone a long way since its inception, over its introduction to the masses, to the widespread recognition it enjoys today; there have been radical changes, but also various sorts of cosmetic surgery, yet none of which managed to affect its operation and basis. Theoretically speaking, the mouse is a peripheral input device the basic function of which is to detect two-dimensional movement on a plane and converting it into an electrical signal used by the computer to define cursor movement on the display. This dry definition by itself shows that not much has changed in the mice world since the beginning; however, the evolution of mice is interspersed with battles against other sorts of input devices, concepts and technologies. Yet the mouse has proven to be a resistant little fellow, and we're pretty certain that it's going to stick to our desktops (in both meanings) for some time to come. This is why we've decided to have a look back at the fascinating history of mice, from the "ball" to the cutting-edge laser technology.

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SAPPHIRE Vid-2X

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Sapphire has been attempting to reach out of the graphics card manufacturing business for a while now, albeit with limited success; yet they've managed to get some praise for the surprises they come up with every now and then. Their motherboards are solid, depending on the model, their mini PC solutions very good, and as the last in the line of entirely new devices, one that is bound to have a very limited audience, but deserves to be mentioned nevertheless. Say that you have a notebook with a single digital output, such as DVI or DisplayPort, but your work necessitates multiple monitors. This is a practically insoluble situation, bar the help of an external solution. Well, Sapphire's VID-2X is just that. Two versions exist, one with DVI and the other with DisplayPort, while both provide a couple of single-DVI outputs at the other end (which can be easily converted to HDMI outputs with the usual connectors you can purchase separately). We got the latter version for testing, which turned out great, since the author of this text has just such an output on his notebook.

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